Event Title

A Pilot Study: An Interprofessional Educational Approach to Polypharmacy in Community-Based Older Adults

Location

DeVos 109D

Start Date

7-1-2011 1:30 PM

End Date

7-1-2011 2:00 PM

Description

Purpose: The purpose of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of an interprofessional educational approach that paired 25 nursing students and 25 pharmacy students from 2 universities to teach community-dwelling elder clients about polypharmacy issues. All students attended two faculty (nursing and pharmacy) facilitated seminars and conducted 3 joint home visits.

Background/Significance: The need for competent nurses and pharmacists is increasing as the aging population in the United States burgeons. In the Institute of Medicine report, Crossing the Quality Chasm (2001), increasing the abilities of interprofessional teams to work together to improve the safety, timeliness and efficiency of patient care was one strategy identified to enhance quality of care (including medication management).

Methodology: On pre and post-tests, students identified which of 15 professional role functions could be performed by both nurses and pharmacists. Qualitative analysis using axial coding to discover themes was done of students' and older adults' perceptions about the experience.

Results: Post-test frequency percentages indicated an increase in the number of students who recognized that their roles overlap on all but one of the fifteen roles. Qualitative analysis of students' perceptions revealed a number of themes including appreciation for the perspective and expertise of another professional to the patient care outcomes. Four themes emerged from the elders' perceptions of the experience; they clearly valued the interaction with the students as a "team". Elders identified six improved medication outcomes as a result of the experience.

Conclusions: As a result of conducting this pilot with three cohorts of students between 2 universities, 2 colleges, and 25 elders, the following recommendations should be considered: obtain a letter of agreement between the college deans to cover student liability issues well in advance; involve nursing students who have already completed a pharmacology course; establish stellar rapport between interdisciplinary faculty in order to role model inter-disciplinary collaboration in the classroom and as supervisors of the students' joint care plan preparation; explore educational cultural differences and acknowledge them openly the first time students meet. Additional recommendations to launching a similar pilot will be shared and suggestions sought for improving and expanding this seminar/clinical experience.



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Jan 7th, 1:30 PM Jan 7th, 2:00 PM

A Pilot Study: An Interprofessional Educational Approach to Polypharmacy in Community-Based Older Adults

DeVos 109D

Purpose: The purpose of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of an interprofessional educational approach that paired 25 nursing students and 25 pharmacy students from 2 universities to teach community-dwelling elder clients about polypharmacy issues. All students attended two faculty (nursing and pharmacy) facilitated seminars and conducted 3 joint home visits.

Background/Significance: The need for competent nurses and pharmacists is increasing as the aging population in the United States burgeons. In the Institute of Medicine report, Crossing the Quality Chasm (2001), increasing the abilities of interprofessional teams to work together to improve the safety, timeliness and efficiency of patient care was one strategy identified to enhance quality of care (including medication management).

Methodology: On pre and post-tests, students identified which of 15 professional role functions could be performed by both nurses and pharmacists. Qualitative analysis using axial coding to discover themes was done of students' and older adults' perceptions about the experience.

Results: Post-test frequency percentages indicated an increase in the number of students who recognized that their roles overlap on all but one of the fifteen roles. Qualitative analysis of students' perceptions revealed a number of themes including appreciation for the perspective and expertise of another professional to the patient care outcomes. Four themes emerged from the elders' perceptions of the experience; they clearly valued the interaction with the students as a "team". Elders identified six improved medication outcomes as a result of the experience.

Conclusions: As a result of conducting this pilot with three cohorts of students between 2 universities, 2 colleges, and 25 elders, the following recommendations should be considered: obtain a letter of agreement between the college deans to cover student liability issues well in advance; involve nursing students who have already completed a pharmacology course; establish stellar rapport between interdisciplinary faculty in order to role model inter-disciplinary collaboration in the classroom and as supervisors of the students' joint care plan preparation; explore educational cultural differences and acknowledge them openly the first time students meet. Additional recommendations to launching a similar pilot will be shared and suggestions sought for improving and expanding this seminar/clinical experience.