Event Title

Teaching Self-Advocacy to Eighth Grade Students with Learning Disabilities

Location

Exhibition Hall, DeVos Center

Start Date

28-3-2011 4:30 PM

Description

PURPOSE: Research has shown that students with learning disabilities are often passive learners and have less positive attitudes towards school because of their history of failure (Firth, Greaves, & Frydenberg, 2010; Kortering & Christenson, 2009). These students might not have knowledge of their strengths and weaknesses or have the communication skills to self-advocate. Studies have been conducted that show students with learning disabilities are able to learn, retain, and generalize the self-advocacy skills needed for positive school and life outcomes Durlak, Rose, & Bursuck, 1994; Fiedler & Danneker, 2007; Phillips, 1990; Van Reusen, Bos, Schumaker, & Deshler, 1994). The purpose of this project was to develop an instructional unit for teaching self-advocacy skills to middle school students with learning disabilities. PROCEDURES: Strategies that teach self-advocacy skills to students with learning disabilities have been found to include three main sections: (1) identifying the strengths and weaknesses of a student, (2) providing intentional instruction of self-advocacy skills, and (3) providing opportunities for these students to plan for their future, including their transition into high school. CONCLUSIONS: This unit on teaching self-advocacy skills to middle school students contains 6 lessons designed to be delivered in 6-8 class periods. In addition to the class time involved, there is a cumulative educational meeting to be held with parents. IMPACT: This project includes activities that enable students with learning disabilities to identify their strengths and weaknesses and learn how these skills impact their education. Students have an opportunity to learn about their own disabilities, practice effective communications skills, and become an active participant in their educational planning.

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Mar 28th, 4:30 PM

Teaching Self-Advocacy to Eighth Grade Students with Learning Disabilities

Exhibition Hall, DeVos Center

PURPOSE: Research has shown that students with learning disabilities are often passive learners and have less positive attitudes towards school because of their history of failure (Firth, Greaves, & Frydenberg, 2010; Kortering & Christenson, 2009). These students might not have knowledge of their strengths and weaknesses or have the communication skills to self-advocate. Studies have been conducted that show students with learning disabilities are able to learn, retain, and generalize the self-advocacy skills needed for positive school and life outcomes Durlak, Rose, & Bursuck, 1994; Fiedler & Danneker, 2007; Phillips, 1990; Van Reusen, Bos, Schumaker, & Deshler, 1994). The purpose of this project was to develop an instructional unit for teaching self-advocacy skills to middle school students with learning disabilities. PROCEDURES: Strategies that teach self-advocacy skills to students with learning disabilities have been found to include three main sections: (1) identifying the strengths and weaknesses of a student, (2) providing intentional instruction of self-advocacy skills, and (3) providing opportunities for these students to plan for their future, including their transition into high school. CONCLUSIONS: This unit on teaching self-advocacy skills to middle school students contains 6 lessons designed to be delivered in 6-8 class periods. In addition to the class time involved, there is a cumulative educational meeting to be held with parents. IMPACT: This project includes activities that enable students with learning disabilities to identify their strengths and weaknesses and learn how these skills impact their education. Students have an opportunity to learn about their own disabilities, practice effective communications skills, and become an active participant in their educational planning.