Event Title

Activity and Participation Levels in 6-12-Year-Old Children With Cerebral Palsy: A Pilot Study

Location

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

Start Date

2-4-2014 3:30 PM

Description

PURPOSE: Adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) are less physically active and often participate in less structured and lower intensity activities than their typically developing peers. The purpose of this study was to examine the intensity of functional and recreational activities of younger ambulatory children with CP, as well as their manual dexterity and communication skills, and to relate the findings to typically developing children. SUBJECTS: 3 male participants with CP, ages 9-11. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A RT3 triaxial accelerometer was worn for 2 school and 2 weekend days. The child and parent(s) completed an activity log and the CAPE/PAC measure. Each child was classified using the GMFCS, MACS, and CFCS. RESULTS: Child 1-3 reported high enjoyment for most of their activities; most activities were performed with family at home. All 3 reported the highest diversity, intensity and preference for recreational activities. The 3 children reported the lowest intensity for the physical activity category and the highest enjoyment for physical activity or skill-based activity. Participation in informal activities was more frequent and higher intensity than formal activities. Child 1-3 demonstrated total activity counts in school higher than after school. CONCLUSIONS: All children reported lower intensity for physical activity in comparison to recreation, social, skill-based, and self-improvement activities. While all three children identified several preferred activities, many barriers prevented the children from actually completing these activities. The children experienced higher activity counts during school activities, which identifies the benefit of scheduled, organized physical activity. In comparison to typically-developing, age-matched peers, all three children demonstrated a much lower amount of time per day spent in hard or vigorous activity.

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Apr 2nd, 3:30 PM

Activity and Participation Levels in 6-12-Year-Old Children With Cerebral Palsy: A Pilot Study

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

PURPOSE: Adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) are less physically active and often participate in less structured and lower intensity activities than their typically developing peers. The purpose of this study was to examine the intensity of functional and recreational activities of younger ambulatory children with CP, as well as their manual dexterity and communication skills, and to relate the findings to typically developing children. SUBJECTS: 3 male participants with CP, ages 9-11. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A RT3 triaxial accelerometer was worn for 2 school and 2 weekend days. The child and parent(s) completed an activity log and the CAPE/PAC measure. Each child was classified using the GMFCS, MACS, and CFCS. RESULTS: Child 1-3 reported high enjoyment for most of their activities; most activities were performed with family at home. All 3 reported the highest diversity, intensity and preference for recreational activities. The 3 children reported the lowest intensity for the physical activity category and the highest enjoyment for physical activity or skill-based activity. Participation in informal activities was more frequent and higher intensity than formal activities. Child 1-3 demonstrated total activity counts in school higher than after school. CONCLUSIONS: All children reported lower intensity for physical activity in comparison to recreation, social, skill-based, and self-improvement activities. While all three children identified several preferred activities, many barriers prevented the children from actually completing these activities. The children experienced higher activity counts during school activities, which identifies the benefit of scheduled, organized physical activity. In comparison to typically-developing, age-matched peers, all three children demonstrated a much lower amount of time per day spent in hard or vigorous activity.