Event Title

Age and Gender as Predictors of Post-Concussion Syndrome Manifestations Following Minor Traumatic Brain Injury

Location

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

Start Date

2-4-2014 3:30 PM

Description

PURPOSE: Post-concussion syndrome (PCS), in its many forms, carries significant impact on quality of life. The purpose of this study was to determine if PCS manifestations could be predicted by gender, age (pre- or post-menopausal age groups), or by the length of time elapsed after injury. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A retrospective medical chart review screened 510 adult patients with PCS who sought care at an outpatient post-concussion clinic from 1999–2004. ANALYSES: Data were evaluated to correlate PCS manifestations with predictors by backwards logistic regression and multiple regressions. RESULTS: Females in the premenopausal group were more likely to present with headache (OR = 5.00) and post-menopausal females are more likely to present with a combination of cognitive changes and headaches (OR = 2.49). Females have a higher likelihood of presenting with dizziness (OR = 3.38) and with both pain and headache (OR = 2.85) if within 3 months post-injury. Females are more likely to present with both dizziness/vertigo and balance changes 3 months post-injury or later (OR = 2.13). Further, the post-menopausal age group was more likely to have balance changes as a presenting symptom 3 months or greater post-injury than the premenopausal age group presenting within 3 months (OR = 8.32). CONCLUSIONS: This study found demographic predictors of presenting symptoms of PCS as well as symptom differences over the progression of time after injury. There was variation between symptoms common to premenopausal versus post-menopausal females, as well as symptoms in the first three months post-injury versus after 3 months.

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Apr 2nd, 3:30 PM

Age and Gender as Predictors of Post-Concussion Syndrome Manifestations Following Minor Traumatic Brain Injury

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

PURPOSE: Post-concussion syndrome (PCS), in its many forms, carries significant impact on quality of life. The purpose of this study was to determine if PCS manifestations could be predicted by gender, age (pre- or post-menopausal age groups), or by the length of time elapsed after injury. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A retrospective medical chart review screened 510 adult patients with PCS who sought care at an outpatient post-concussion clinic from 1999–2004. ANALYSES: Data were evaluated to correlate PCS manifestations with predictors by backwards logistic regression and multiple regressions. RESULTS: Females in the premenopausal group were more likely to present with headache (OR = 5.00) and post-menopausal females are more likely to present with a combination of cognitive changes and headaches (OR = 2.49). Females have a higher likelihood of presenting with dizziness (OR = 3.38) and with both pain and headache (OR = 2.85) if within 3 months post-injury. Females are more likely to present with both dizziness/vertigo and balance changes 3 months post-injury or later (OR = 2.13). Further, the post-menopausal age group was more likely to have balance changes as a presenting symptom 3 months or greater post-injury than the premenopausal age group presenting within 3 months (OR = 8.32). CONCLUSIONS: This study found demographic predictors of presenting symptoms of PCS as well as symptom differences over the progression of time after injury. There was variation between symptoms common to premenopausal versus post-menopausal females, as well as symptoms in the first three months post-injury versus after 3 months.