Event Title

An Investigation of Gender Stereotyping on Parental Purchasing Decisions

Location

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

Start Date

19-4-2016 3:30 PM

Description

PURPOSE: The goal of this research is to understand the impact that gender stereotyping, gender roles and gender bias have within the marketplace, especially as they pertain to the cognitive processes employed by adults to select items for children. SUBJECTS: Parents with at least one child seven years or younger were recruited for participation in this project:

Depth Interviews: Five parents: 2 dads, 3 moms All Caucasian (Ages 26 – 44) From Michigan

Online survey: 157 from 40 states All with at least one child younger than 10 years old

METHODS AND MATERIALS: Depth interviews, parents were asked a series of questions to establish a baseline understanding of the biases involved in their selection of toys for their children of different genders and to gain a deeper understanding of their beliefs regarding gender-stereotyped toys. Qualtrics, online data portal, was used to survey a national panel of 157 parents (83% have at least one son, 72% have at least one daughter). ANALYSES: SPSS statistical software were used to conduct descriptive and inferential analysis. RESULTS: Initial results indicate significant differences in the toy selections made for girls and boys under the age of four. The decision hinges largely on the gender of the parent and the number of siblings in the household. CONCLUSIONS: Qualitative research shows directional support for the hypotheses. Between-subjects experimental research will be conducted to determine the underlying theory behind the observed phenomenon. We find that gender stereotypes meant to appeal to parents are projected upon children.

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Apr 19th, 3:30 PM

An Investigation of Gender Stereotyping on Parental Purchasing Decisions

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

PURPOSE: The goal of this research is to understand the impact that gender stereotyping, gender roles and gender bias have within the marketplace, especially as they pertain to the cognitive processes employed by adults to select items for children. SUBJECTS: Parents with at least one child seven years or younger were recruited for participation in this project:

Depth Interviews: Five parents: 2 dads, 3 moms All Caucasian (Ages 26 – 44) From Michigan

Online survey: 157 from 40 states All with at least one child younger than 10 years old

METHODS AND MATERIALS: Depth interviews, parents were asked a series of questions to establish a baseline understanding of the biases involved in their selection of toys for their children of different genders and to gain a deeper understanding of their beliefs regarding gender-stereotyped toys. Qualtrics, online data portal, was used to survey a national panel of 157 parents (83% have at least one son, 72% have at least one daughter). ANALYSES: SPSS statistical software were used to conduct descriptive and inferential analysis. RESULTS: Initial results indicate significant differences in the toy selections made for girls and boys under the age of four. The decision hinges largely on the gender of the parent and the number of siblings in the household. CONCLUSIONS: Qualitative research shows directional support for the hypotheses. Between-subjects experimental research will be conducted to determine the underlying theory behind the observed phenomenon. We find that gender stereotypes meant to appeal to parents are projected upon children.