Event Title

Would Cancer Survivors Accept a Text Messaging Intervention? A Mobile Health (mHealth) Innovation

Location

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

Start Date

19-4-2016 3:30 PM

Description

PURPOSE: 68% of adults own cell phones. Text messaging (TM) may be a way to promote care for cancer patients, however, most trials were in younger populations. We report on TM acceptability in cancer patients over 50. SUBJECTS: 80-participants from cancer centers/specialty pharmacy who were ≥age 21, had a cell phone to TM, and prescribed an oral anti-cancer agent for treatment. METHODS: A secondary data analysis from a randomized controlled trial that examined a 21 to 28-day TM intervention to promote oral-agent adherence and management for treatment-related symptoms. ANALYSES: Descriptive statistics for approached, eligible, and consented are reported on acceptability of TM interventions among cancer survivors. RESULTS: Regarding acceptability, 56.3% patients approached who were eligible consented to participate in the study. Mean age of consented 58.5; eligible not consented 57.24. Of the 142 approached who consented, 60% of those 65+ consented; 53% of those 50-64 consented, and 58.1% of those found. Regarding gender, 59% (n=47) who consented were female, 39% (n=24) eligible but not consented were female. A significant difference in enrollment by sex was found between consented versus eligible but not enrolled (p=.02), with females more likely to enroll. CONCLUSIONS: Among those eligible, age was not related to willingness to TM, with females more likely. Results suggest TM to be an acceptable intervention mode among cancer survivors.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 19th, 3:30 PM

Would Cancer Survivors Accept a Text Messaging Intervention? A Mobile Health (mHealth) Innovation

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

PURPOSE: 68% of adults own cell phones. Text messaging (TM) may be a way to promote care for cancer patients, however, most trials were in younger populations. We report on TM acceptability in cancer patients over 50. SUBJECTS: 80-participants from cancer centers/specialty pharmacy who were ≥age 21, had a cell phone to TM, and prescribed an oral anti-cancer agent for treatment. METHODS: A secondary data analysis from a randomized controlled trial that examined a 21 to 28-day TM intervention to promote oral-agent adherence and management for treatment-related symptoms. ANALYSES: Descriptive statistics for approached, eligible, and consented are reported on acceptability of TM interventions among cancer survivors. RESULTS: Regarding acceptability, 56.3% patients approached who were eligible consented to participate in the study. Mean age of consented 58.5; eligible not consented 57.24. Of the 142 approached who consented, 60% of those 65+ consented; 53% of those 50-64 consented, and 58.1% of those found. Regarding gender, 59% (n=47) who consented were female, 39% (n=24) eligible but not consented were female. A significant difference in enrollment by sex was found between consented versus eligible but not enrolled (p=.02), with females more likely to enroll. CONCLUSIONS: Among those eligible, age was not related to willingness to TM, with females more likely. Results suggest TM to be an acceptable intervention mode among cancer survivors.