Event Title

The Impact of Social Work Simulation on Social Work Students’ Interviewing Performance

Location

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

Start Date

19-4-2016 3:30 PM

Description

PURPOSE: This research study discusses the impact of undergraduates’ performance in a Social Work interviewing course that used Standard Patients at a Simulation Center (SIM-C). SUBJECTS: The subjects are 129 third year, undergraduate students enrolled in the six sections of Interviewing in Social Work for Winter 2015. Students interviewed Standard Patients at the SIM-C either 2 or 3 times over the course of the semester. All students signed a research consent form. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Two trained graduate assistant researchers watched the video recordings of the subjects interacting with their “clients” and rated subjects on the “Simulation Center Interview Score Sheet”, created by MSW faculty members. ANALYSES: The statistical analysis completed included an ANOVA for final results comparison, comparing the six class sections regarding effectiveness of interviewing skills for each class section. Bonferroni post-hoc and SAS Enterprise were also used to compare class sections. RESULTS: Results indicate improvement on the student’s interviewing performance after SIM-C practice with Standard Patients. Increased frequency of practice sessions also showed greater improvement of interviewing performance. CONCLUSIONS: Undergraduate students in this study benefitted from simulated interviewing practice in SIM-C and the course has been modified to include three simulation interviews for all undergraduate students.

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Apr 19th, 3:30 PM

The Impact of Social Work Simulation on Social Work Students’ Interviewing Performance

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

PURPOSE: This research study discusses the impact of undergraduates’ performance in a Social Work interviewing course that used Standard Patients at a Simulation Center (SIM-C). SUBJECTS: The subjects are 129 third year, undergraduate students enrolled in the six sections of Interviewing in Social Work for Winter 2015. Students interviewed Standard Patients at the SIM-C either 2 or 3 times over the course of the semester. All students signed a research consent form. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Two trained graduate assistant researchers watched the video recordings of the subjects interacting with their “clients” and rated subjects on the “Simulation Center Interview Score Sheet”, created by MSW faculty members. ANALYSES: The statistical analysis completed included an ANOVA for final results comparison, comparing the six class sections regarding effectiveness of interviewing skills for each class section. Bonferroni post-hoc and SAS Enterprise were also used to compare class sections. RESULTS: Results indicate improvement on the student’s interviewing performance after SIM-C practice with Standard Patients. Increased frequency of practice sessions also showed greater improvement of interviewing performance. CONCLUSIONS: Undergraduate students in this study benefitted from simulated interviewing practice in SIM-C and the course has been modified to include three simulation interviews for all undergraduate students.