Event Title

The Impact of Graduate Student Leadership on Land Management Work at Blandford Nature Center in the Summer of 2016

Location

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

Start Date

18-4-2017 3:30 PM

Description

PURPOSE: As part of my Master’s program in Biology (Natural Resources emphasis) at Grand Valley State University, I supervised three undergraduate land stewardship students for my graduate internship at Blandford Nature Center, a non-profit organization located on 143 acres in West Michigan. CHALLENGE: Interns provide many benefits to natural resources managers, but they also require a lot of the land manager’s time and attention. The internship provided experience in multiple facets including; leading projects, working with volunteers, and taking on unplanned tasks. EXPERIENCE: Prior to the internship, I completed training in herbicide application, butterfly monitoring, and chainsaw use. During the internship, I could focus on working with and supervising the undergraduate students, allowing the land manager to target other stewardship and land management activities. Activities by the undergraduate interns included completing a natural areas quality index, photographic stand monitoring, invasive species treatments, butterfly monitoring, and GIS mapping. OUTCOME: This tiered model of supervision resulted in a three-fold increase in productivity of tasks. IMPACT: Supervising others taught me effective communication, project management, problem solving, and organization skills.

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Apr 18th, 3:30 PM

The Impact of Graduate Student Leadership on Land Management Work at Blandford Nature Center in the Summer of 2016

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

PURPOSE: As part of my Master’s program in Biology (Natural Resources emphasis) at Grand Valley State University, I supervised three undergraduate land stewardship students for my graduate internship at Blandford Nature Center, a non-profit organization located on 143 acres in West Michigan. CHALLENGE: Interns provide many benefits to natural resources managers, but they also require a lot of the land manager’s time and attention. The internship provided experience in multiple facets including; leading projects, working with volunteers, and taking on unplanned tasks. EXPERIENCE: Prior to the internship, I completed training in herbicide application, butterfly monitoring, and chainsaw use. During the internship, I could focus on working with and supervising the undergraduate students, allowing the land manager to target other stewardship and land management activities. Activities by the undergraduate interns included completing a natural areas quality index, photographic stand monitoring, invasive species treatments, butterfly monitoring, and GIS mapping. OUTCOME: This tiered model of supervision resulted in a three-fold increase in productivity of tasks. IMPACT: Supervising others taught me effective communication, project management, problem solving, and organization skills.