Event Title

Biological Invasions on a Large Scale: Investigating the Spread of Baby’s Breath (Gypsophila paniculata) Across North America

Location

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

Start Date

15-4-2019 3:29 PM

Description

PURPOSE: This study investigates the invasion of baby’s breath (Gypsophila paniculata) across North America, particularly the potential adaptations that allow it to succeed in harsh ecoregions, such as Washington sage-steppes and Michigan dune shores. SUBJECTS: A database of herbarium samples was compiled and analyzed. Tissue samples from nine current populations of invasive baby’s breath were collected from four U.S. states: Washington, North Dakota, Minnesota, and Michigan. Seeds were collected from two populations of special interest: Chelan, Washington and Petoskey, Michigan. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Samples were genotyped at 14 microsatellite loci to infer relatedness between populations. RNA-seq based transcriptomes were established for populations in Chelan, WA and Petoskey, MI. A germination growth trial was conducted between these two populations. ANALYSES: Using Bayesian and multivariate methods, the number of genetic clusters across the sampling area was established. FST and DST were used to examine genetic similarity among populations. Principal Coordinates Analysis was used to explore transcriptome data. A time-to-event analysis was conducted on germination data. RESULTS: Cluster analyses revealed two distinct genetic clusters. Surprisingly, Petoskey, MI clustered separately from other MI populations and was most closely related to WA populations. Transcriptome analysis comparing WA and MI populations shows differential expression of genes related to flowering time, drought response, and circadian rhythms. Germination trials show that seeds from WA germinate significantly faster than those collected in MI. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest more than one invasion event of G. paniculata. Further analyses reveal potential adaptations that may help this invader succeed in diverse, harsh environments.

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Apr 15th, 3:29 PM

Biological Invasions on a Large Scale: Investigating the Spread of Baby’s Breath (Gypsophila paniculata) Across North America

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

PURPOSE: This study investigates the invasion of baby’s breath (Gypsophila paniculata) across North America, particularly the potential adaptations that allow it to succeed in harsh ecoregions, such as Washington sage-steppes and Michigan dune shores. SUBJECTS: A database of herbarium samples was compiled and analyzed. Tissue samples from nine current populations of invasive baby’s breath were collected from four U.S. states: Washington, North Dakota, Minnesota, and Michigan. Seeds were collected from two populations of special interest: Chelan, Washington and Petoskey, Michigan. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Samples were genotyped at 14 microsatellite loci to infer relatedness between populations. RNA-seq based transcriptomes were established for populations in Chelan, WA and Petoskey, MI. A germination growth trial was conducted between these two populations. ANALYSES: Using Bayesian and multivariate methods, the number of genetic clusters across the sampling area was established. FST and DST were used to examine genetic similarity among populations. Principal Coordinates Analysis was used to explore transcriptome data. A time-to-event analysis was conducted on germination data. RESULTS: Cluster analyses revealed two distinct genetic clusters. Surprisingly, Petoskey, MI clustered separately from other MI populations and was most closely related to WA populations. Transcriptome analysis comparing WA and MI populations shows differential expression of genes related to flowering time, drought response, and circadian rhythms. Germination trials show that seeds from WA germinate significantly faster than those collected in MI. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest more than one invasion event of G. paniculata. Further analyses reveal potential adaptations that may help this invader succeed in diverse, harsh environments.