Event Title

The Association Between Dietary Niche Variation in Rodents and Climate Change Across the Paleocene-eocene Thermal Maximum

Location

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

Start Date

15-4-2019 3:30 PM

Description

PURPOSE: Mammalian teeth play a crucial role in food acquisition and breakdown. Therefore, they are closely tied to dietary niche. This study reconstructed the diet of early Paleogene paramyid rodents across the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum climatic event in an effort to understand the role of climate in mammalian dietary niche change. SUBJECTS: µCT scans of ninety-three first or second mandibular molars were utilized in this study. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Dietary niches were quantified using three dental topographic measures (Dirichlet normal energy, relief index, and orientation patch count rotated) and known climate data was collected from literature. ANALYSES: Analysis of variance was utilized to examine dietary niche change, and this was compared to known climate data using correlation analysis. RESULTS: Correlation analysis indicated that dietary niche change in these paramyid rodents was associated with climate change across the time period studied (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate the significance of climate change on the dietary niche of these rodents. There are potentially broader implications for mammalian interactions such as competition for resources.

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Apr 15th, 3:30 PM

The Association Between Dietary Niche Variation in Rodents and Climate Change Across the Paleocene-eocene Thermal Maximum

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

PURPOSE: Mammalian teeth play a crucial role in food acquisition and breakdown. Therefore, they are closely tied to dietary niche. This study reconstructed the diet of early Paleogene paramyid rodents across the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum climatic event in an effort to understand the role of climate in mammalian dietary niche change. SUBJECTS: µCT scans of ninety-three first or second mandibular molars were utilized in this study. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Dietary niches were quantified using three dental topographic measures (Dirichlet normal energy, relief index, and orientation patch count rotated) and known climate data was collected from literature. ANALYSES: Analysis of variance was utilized to examine dietary niche change, and this was compared to known climate data using correlation analysis. RESULTS: Correlation analysis indicated that dietary niche change in these paramyid rodents was associated with climate change across the time period studied (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate the significance of climate change on the dietary niche of these rodents. There are potentially broader implications for mammalian interactions such as competition for resources.