Date of Award

1994

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Physical Therapy (M.S.)

Department

Physical Therapy

First Advisor

Jane Toot

Second Advisor

William Bell

Third Advisor

John Ritch

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a perceived advantage among employers in holding a particular entry-level degree in physical therapy when seeking employment or when being considered for promotion to an administrative/supervisory position. The investigators tested two separate hypotheses: (1) There is no perceived advantage among employers in holding an entry-level master's degree when seeking employment as a staff physical therapist, and (2) There is a perceived advantage among employers in holding an entry-level master's degree when being considered for promotion to an administrative/supervisory position. The investigators sent a questionnaire to the director/supervisor of rehabilitation in all of the rehabilitation hospitals throughout the United States that were registered with the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) as of January 1, 1993. Each hospital had a Comprehensive Inpatient Rehabilitation (CIR) program. This questionnaire contained questions relating to entry-level degree and how it relates to hiring and promoting of staff physical therapists. A total of 499 questionnaires were sent out nationwide and 357 were returned to the investigators giving a return rate of 71.5%. Of the respondents electing to answer the questions regarding specifically with entry-level degree as it relates to hiring and promoting, 71.1% perceived an advantage to holding an entry-level master's degree when seeking employment and 82.8% perceived an advantage to holding an entry-level master's degree when being considered for promotion to an administrative/supervisory position.

Comments

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