Date of Award

1998

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Nursing (M.S.N.)

Department

College of Nursing

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of patient participation in decision-making regarding post-operative ambulation on ambulation behaviors, occurrence of post operative complications, and overall satisfaction for patients undergoing bowel surgery. A convenience sample consisted of 39 subjects, aged 20-80, who underwent bowel surgery at a 300-bed medical center in a midwest metropolitan area.

An active negotiated approach to encourage patient participation in decision-making regarding post-operative ambulation was utilized for subjects in the experimental group (n = 19). It was hypothesized that subjects in the experimental group would ambulate farther and more frequently, would experience fewer post-operative complications, and would have higher levels of satisfaction than subjects in the control group (n = 20).

No significant differences were found between the two groups regarding frequency of ambulation, distance ambulated, or level of satisfaction with care (p > .05). Subjects in the control group did experience a significantly greater number of complications than did subjects in the experimental group (p < .05).

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