Keywords

Gender differences, Competition, Sports, Evolutionary psychology, Distance running, Title IX, Athletics, Motivation, Elite athletes, Preferences

Disciplines

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Abstract

Sex differences in some preferences and motivations are well established, but it is unclear whether they persist in selective sub-populations, such as expert financial decision makers, top scientists, or elite athletes. We addressed this issue by studying competitiveness in 1,147 varsity intercollegiate distance runners. As expected, across all runners, men reported greater competitiveness with two previously validated instruments, greater competitiveness on a new elite competitiveness scale, and greater training volume, a known correlate of competitiveness. Among faster runners, the sex difference decreased for one measure of competitiveness but did not decrease for the two other competitiveness measures or either measure of training volume. Across NCAA athletic divisions (DI, DII, DIII), the sex difference did not decrease for any competitiveness or training measure. Further analyses showed that these sex differences could not be attributed to women suffering more injuries or facing greater childcare responsibilities. However, women did report greater commitment than men to their academic studies, suggesting a sex difference in priorities. Therefore, policies aiming to provide men and women with equal opportunities to flourish should acknowledge that sex differences in some kinds of preferences and motivation may persist even in selective sub-populations.

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Original Citation

Deaner, R. O., Lowen, A., Rogers, W., & Saksa, E. (2015). Does the sex difference in competitiveness decrease in selective sub-populations? A test with intercollegiate distance runners. PeerJ. http://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.884

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