Event Title

Health Check: Analyzing Trends in West Michigan

Location

Exhibition Hall, DeVos Center

Start Date

28-3-2011 4:30 PM

Description

INTRODUCTION: This study provides a framework for assessing key data elements and identifying trends in three areas: knowledge foundations, health care trends, and health related economic analysis; which can be used to address the challenges of cost-effectiveness of health-services and healthcare availability in West Michigan (Kent, Ottawa, Muskegon, and Allegan – KOMA). METHODS: Data sets were collected from several educational institutes, and governmental and non-profit organizations as well as a survey of area hospitals in KOMA. Statistical Analysis: Linear time-based analysis was used to identify knowledge foundation and healthcare trends. Occupational projections were calculated by extracting a KOMA population based component from overall state projections. Log-log regression analysis was used determine healthcare usage and cost drivers. RESULTS: Knowledge Foundations: Distinct increase in patent activity in Grand Rapids since 2005. Patent activity is growing at a faster rate than peer communities in Oregon and Ohio. Enough graduates are being produced to fulfill projected occupational requirements in 2018 with the exception of nurses. Health Care Trends: The KOMA and Michigan populations are ageing with a corresponding decline in the 18-34 year old cohort. Increasing trends were identified in select risk factors and disease incidence. Overall health status in KOMA is better than Detroit and Michigan, but worse than the nation. Economic Analysis: Biggest drivers of fair or poor health are smoking, obesity and binge-drinking. Range of medical facilities/services in Cuyahoga, OH is 3-4 times larger than that offered in Kent, MI but Cuyahoga’s population is only twice the size of Kent. Overall hospital confidence in health sector economic viability is high (87%). Emergency room visits, patient care costs and uncompensated charges are increasing. CONCLUSION:West Michigan faces significant challenges in the areas of obesity, and binge drinking which lead to diabetes, stroke and heart disease. Coupled with an ageing population and declining low-risk youth (18-34) cohort, demand for medical services is expected to continue to increase. Conversely, the disturbing trend of rising uncompensated charges reflects the increasing number of persons without medical insurance coverage in challenging economic times. Finally, increasing innovation (patents) in West Michigan may help support growth and investment in the health sector.

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Mar 28th, 4:30 PM

Health Check: Analyzing Trends in West Michigan

Exhibition Hall, DeVos Center

INTRODUCTION: This study provides a framework for assessing key data elements and identifying trends in three areas: knowledge foundations, health care trends, and health related economic analysis; which can be used to address the challenges of cost-effectiveness of health-services and healthcare availability in West Michigan (Kent, Ottawa, Muskegon, and Allegan – KOMA). METHODS: Data sets were collected from several educational institutes, and governmental and non-profit organizations as well as a survey of area hospitals in KOMA. Statistical Analysis: Linear time-based analysis was used to identify knowledge foundation and healthcare trends. Occupational projections were calculated by extracting a KOMA population based component from overall state projections. Log-log regression analysis was used determine healthcare usage and cost drivers. RESULTS: Knowledge Foundations: Distinct increase in patent activity in Grand Rapids since 2005. Patent activity is growing at a faster rate than peer communities in Oregon and Ohio. Enough graduates are being produced to fulfill projected occupational requirements in 2018 with the exception of nurses. Health Care Trends: The KOMA and Michigan populations are ageing with a corresponding decline in the 18-34 year old cohort. Increasing trends were identified in select risk factors and disease incidence. Overall health status in KOMA is better than Detroit and Michigan, but worse than the nation. Economic Analysis: Biggest drivers of fair or poor health are smoking, obesity and binge-drinking. Range of medical facilities/services in Cuyahoga, OH is 3-4 times larger than that offered in Kent, MI but Cuyahoga’s population is only twice the size of Kent. Overall hospital confidence in health sector economic viability is high (87%). Emergency room visits, patient care costs and uncompensated charges are increasing. CONCLUSION:West Michigan faces significant challenges in the areas of obesity, and binge drinking which lead to diabetes, stroke and heart disease. Coupled with an ageing population and declining low-risk youth (18-34) cohort, demand for medical services is expected to continue to increase. Conversely, the disturbing trend of rising uncompensated charges reflects the increasing number of persons without medical insurance coverage in challenging economic times. Finally, increasing innovation (patents) in West Michigan may help support growth and investment in the health sector.