Event Title

Exploring Male and Female Inmate Misconduct

Location

Exhibition Hall, DeVos Center

Start Date

10-4-2012 3:30 PM

Description

PURPOSE: There has been a great deal of research conducted that has examined inmate behavior. Two of the most prominent theories offered to explain this behavior are importation and deprivation theory. This research attempts to determine if importation and deprivation variables are related to inmate misconduct and whether there are differences across male and female institutional behavior, particularly misconduct. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Data analyzed were collected by the North Carolina Department of Corrections and include information on every inmate incarcerated in a North Carolina Department of Corrections facility during summer 2010. ANALYSES: Multiple regressions techniques, namely, Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression was used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Results indicated that both the deprivation and importation models of inmate behavior explained why inmates in North Carolina committed behavioral infractions. Further, results indicated that there were differences across gender when it came to predicting infractions. CONCLUSIONS: Findings showed support for both the importation and deprivation models, similar to previous research, and support for the hypothesis that men and women react differently to the prison setting. These findings underscore the need for more gender-specific research and programming for males and females.

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Apr 10th, 3:30 PM

Exploring Male and Female Inmate Misconduct

Exhibition Hall, DeVos Center

PURPOSE: There has been a great deal of research conducted that has examined inmate behavior. Two of the most prominent theories offered to explain this behavior are importation and deprivation theory. This research attempts to determine if importation and deprivation variables are related to inmate misconduct and whether there are differences across male and female institutional behavior, particularly misconduct. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Data analyzed were collected by the North Carolina Department of Corrections and include information on every inmate incarcerated in a North Carolina Department of Corrections facility during summer 2010. ANALYSES: Multiple regressions techniques, namely, Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression was used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Results indicated that both the deprivation and importation models of inmate behavior explained why inmates in North Carolina committed behavioral infractions. Further, results indicated that there were differences across gender when it came to predicting infractions. CONCLUSIONS: Findings showed support for both the importation and deprivation models, similar to previous research, and support for the hypothesis that men and women react differently to the prison setting. These findings underscore the need for more gender-specific research and programming for males and females.