Event Title

Exercise Response in Non-Ambulatory Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis: A Multiple Single Subject Design

Location

Exhibition Hall, DeVos Center

Start Date

10-4-2012 3:30 PM

Description

Introduction: There is no evidence showing the benefits of exercise in individuals with MS who are non-ambulatory. The purpose of this study is to explore if exercise will improve the function and quality of life in these individuals. Subjects: Two individuals who had MS and were non-ambulatory participated. Methods and Materials: An AB research design was implemented over the course of 10 weeks with follow-up at four weeks post intervention. Phase A served as a two week control period and phase B consisted of eight weeks of exercise training with the following outcome measures administered weekly; the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS), Short Form-12 Questionnaire (SF-12), Patient Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), handheld grip dynamometry, submaximal upper body ergometry, and limits of stability via the Equitest System. Analysis: Meaningful changes were determined using the two standard deviation band method. Results: Participant 1 showed significant improvements in the Cognitive MFIS, and demonstrated an improvement on the PSFS. Significant improvements in both right and left grip strength improved. Participant 2 demonstrated significant improvements in the Cognitive, Physical and Psychosocial MFIS. A significant improvement in the Mental Composite SF-12 was found, as well as significant improvements on the PSFS. Equitest measures of directional control, end point excursion and maximal excursion improved for both participants. Conclusion: Meaningful impairment-based measures of dynamic sitting balance improved in both participants and arm strength improved in Participant 1. Meaningful functional improvements occurred in fatigue, quality of life measures, patient specified functional tasks and cardiovascular response for both participants.

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Apr 10th, 3:30 PM

Exercise Response in Non-Ambulatory Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis: A Multiple Single Subject Design

Exhibition Hall, DeVos Center

Introduction: There is no evidence showing the benefits of exercise in individuals with MS who are non-ambulatory. The purpose of this study is to explore if exercise will improve the function and quality of life in these individuals. Subjects: Two individuals who had MS and were non-ambulatory participated. Methods and Materials: An AB research design was implemented over the course of 10 weeks with follow-up at four weeks post intervention. Phase A served as a two week control period and phase B consisted of eight weeks of exercise training with the following outcome measures administered weekly; the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS), Short Form-12 Questionnaire (SF-12), Patient Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), handheld grip dynamometry, submaximal upper body ergometry, and limits of stability via the Equitest System. Analysis: Meaningful changes were determined using the two standard deviation band method. Results: Participant 1 showed significant improvements in the Cognitive MFIS, and demonstrated an improvement on the PSFS. Significant improvements in both right and left grip strength improved. Participant 2 demonstrated significant improvements in the Cognitive, Physical and Psychosocial MFIS. A significant improvement in the Mental Composite SF-12 was found, as well as significant improvements on the PSFS. Equitest measures of directional control, end point excursion and maximal excursion improved for both participants. Conclusion: Meaningful impairment-based measures of dynamic sitting balance improved in both participants and arm strength improved in Participant 1. Meaningful functional improvements occurred in fatigue, quality of life measures, patient specified functional tasks and cardiovascular response for both participants.