Event Title

Pain Management and the Postoperative Orthopedic Patient

Location

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

Start Date

16-4-2013 3:30 PM

Description

PROBLEM AND SIGNIFICANT STATEMENT: Under-treated pain is a significant problem in the United States leading to dissatisfaction and poor patient outcomes. On a local orthopedic in-patient unit, patient satisfaction scores related to pain management are lower than targeted, patients are not currently requested to give input to their own pain management regimen, and no distinct plan exists for pain management after surgery. LITERATURE REVIEW: The literature suggests that a patient who receives an educational intervention with consistent postoperative education will be better able to manage pain at time of discharge. Evidence also relates that patients wish to be more involved in the pain management regimen and empowered patients are better able to control pain after discharge when care is delivered in this way. PROTOCOL/INTERVENTION: Nurses will introduce a new form to patients upon admission to the post-operative unit. Patients will communicate their desired preferences for pain management therapies, including medications and other non-pharmacological modalities using the form. Nurses will educate the patient about pain goals and how the health care team will help the patient to meet the goals. The healthcare team will individualize and standardize the pain management plan of care based on the needs, recommendations, and input of the patient. OUTCOMES: The intervention will improve patient satisfaction with pain control and increase nurse and provider satisfaction with the pain management process. The intervention will also provide a more consistent pain plan to allow for provision of optimal postoperative care and reduced pain scores.

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Apr 16th, 3:30 PM

Pain Management and the Postoperative Orthopedic Patient

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

PROBLEM AND SIGNIFICANT STATEMENT: Under-treated pain is a significant problem in the United States leading to dissatisfaction and poor patient outcomes. On a local orthopedic in-patient unit, patient satisfaction scores related to pain management are lower than targeted, patients are not currently requested to give input to their own pain management regimen, and no distinct plan exists for pain management after surgery. LITERATURE REVIEW: The literature suggests that a patient who receives an educational intervention with consistent postoperative education will be better able to manage pain at time of discharge. Evidence also relates that patients wish to be more involved in the pain management regimen and empowered patients are better able to control pain after discharge when care is delivered in this way. PROTOCOL/INTERVENTION: Nurses will introduce a new form to patients upon admission to the post-operative unit. Patients will communicate their desired preferences for pain management therapies, including medications and other non-pharmacological modalities using the form. Nurses will educate the patient about pain goals and how the health care team will help the patient to meet the goals. The healthcare team will individualize and standardize the pain management plan of care based on the needs, recommendations, and input of the patient. OUTCOMES: The intervention will improve patient satisfaction with pain control and increase nurse and provider satisfaction with the pain management process. The intervention will also provide a more consistent pain plan to allow for provision of optimal postoperative care and reduced pain scores.