Event Title

Effectiveness of State Smoking Restrictions Reducing Number of Smokers

Location

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

Start Date

2-4-2014 3:30 PM

Description

PURPOSE: As of January 2014, 43 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico have laws in effect requiring non-hospitality workplaces, bars and/or restaurants to be 100% smoke free. In addition to tobacco taxes, graphic public service announcements have been airing frequently to encourage smokers to kick the habit. The purpose of this study was to examine if a no smoking law in the state resulted in lower number of reported smokers. SUBJECTS: Adults 18 years or older (n= 50,569) who participated in the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Survey smoking question. METHODS: Data was obtained from 2011 BRFS and relationships were calculated using SPSS. ANALYSES: The number of reported smokers was cross tabulated with state tobacco taxes as well as smoking restrictions, which were categorized into three levels ranging from none, some and completely smoke free. RESULTS: States that had no smoking restrictions in place accounted for 80.2% of former/nonsmokers, states that had some smoking restrictions accounted for 82.5% and completely smoke free states accounted for 84.0% of former/nonsmokers. Of the states with tobacco taxes at $2.00 per pack of cigarettes or higher, 88.2% were completely smoke free. CONCLUSION: Results show that states with higher tobacco taxes are more likely to be completely smoke free as well as have fewer smokers. States with some restrictions or completely smoke free laws in place have a higher incidence of former/nonsmokers.

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Apr 2nd, 3:30 PM

Effectiveness of State Smoking Restrictions Reducing Number of Smokers

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

PURPOSE: As of January 2014, 43 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico have laws in effect requiring non-hospitality workplaces, bars and/or restaurants to be 100% smoke free. In addition to tobacco taxes, graphic public service announcements have been airing frequently to encourage smokers to kick the habit. The purpose of this study was to examine if a no smoking law in the state resulted in lower number of reported smokers. SUBJECTS: Adults 18 years or older (n= 50,569) who participated in the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Survey smoking question. METHODS: Data was obtained from 2011 BRFS and relationships were calculated using SPSS. ANALYSES: The number of reported smokers was cross tabulated with state tobacco taxes as well as smoking restrictions, which were categorized into three levels ranging from none, some and completely smoke free. RESULTS: States that had no smoking restrictions in place accounted for 80.2% of former/nonsmokers, states that had some smoking restrictions accounted for 82.5% and completely smoke free states accounted for 84.0% of former/nonsmokers. Of the states with tobacco taxes at $2.00 per pack of cigarettes or higher, 88.2% were completely smoke free. CONCLUSION: Results show that states with higher tobacco taxes are more likely to be completely smoke free as well as have fewer smokers. States with some restrictions or completely smoke free laws in place have a higher incidence of former/nonsmokers.