Event Title

Retaining Staff Members of Color at a Midwestern Predominately White Institution

Location

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

Start Date

19-4-2016 3:30 PM

Description

PURPOSE: This study focuses on the retention of staff of color at a Midwestern predominantly White institution and what types of support this institution can provide in order to retain their staff members of color. SUBJECTS: There was a total of 18 participants of this study who were current and past professional staff members of a Midwestern predominantly White institution who self-identified as ethnic/racial minoritized individuals. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Data were collected through semi-structured, one-on-one interviews. ANALYSES: Using a phenomenological approach, line-by-line coding was used to create 44 codes that emerged from the data were then grouped into 18 concepts and finally categorized into 6 overarching themes. RESULTS: The final themes that emerged after analyzing the data were (1) institutional factors, (2) “the invisible employee,” (3) support, or the lack thereof, (4) unspoken expectations, (5) negativity of the environment, and (6) navigating the institution. CONCLUSION: Staff members stay due to financial reasons and obligations to students. Staff would leave due to blatant disrespect and no hope of change. Participants suggested overall institutional change in the form of (1) staff input, (2) increase representation, (3) provide general support, (4) provide more ways to build connections, (5) mentoring, (6) more training for supervisors, (7) creating more safe spaces for professionals of color, and (8) dealing with racism on campus.

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Apr 19th, 3:30 PM

Retaining Staff Members of Color at a Midwestern Predominately White Institution

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

PURPOSE: This study focuses on the retention of staff of color at a Midwestern predominantly White institution and what types of support this institution can provide in order to retain their staff members of color. SUBJECTS: There was a total of 18 participants of this study who were current and past professional staff members of a Midwestern predominantly White institution who self-identified as ethnic/racial minoritized individuals. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Data were collected through semi-structured, one-on-one interviews. ANALYSES: Using a phenomenological approach, line-by-line coding was used to create 44 codes that emerged from the data were then grouped into 18 concepts and finally categorized into 6 overarching themes. RESULTS: The final themes that emerged after analyzing the data were (1) institutional factors, (2) “the invisible employee,” (3) support, or the lack thereof, (4) unspoken expectations, (5) negativity of the environment, and (6) navigating the institution. CONCLUSION: Staff members stay due to financial reasons and obligations to students. Staff would leave due to blatant disrespect and no hope of change. Participants suggested overall institutional change in the form of (1) staff input, (2) increase representation, (3) provide general support, (4) provide more ways to build connections, (5) mentoring, (6) more training for supervisors, (7) creating more safe spaces for professionals of color, and (8) dealing with racism on campus.