Event Title

A Comparison of Nurse Practitioner, Physician Assistant, and Physician Outcomes: Is There a Difference?

Location

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

Start Date

18-4-2017 3:30 PM

Description

PURPOSE: As the United States population continues to increase, a physician shortage of over 90,000 providers are expected by 2025. During that time, the number of nurse practitioners (NPs) available to fill the provider gap will increase. However, many states, including Michigan, limit the scope of practice of NPs. The purpose of this research project was to evaluate the outcomes of NP care compared to physicians and physician assistants (PAs). METHODS AND MATERIALS: This research project found scholarly articles that evaluated the outcomes of physician, NP, and PA care. A review of literature was conducted using articles published from 2012 to 2016 in the following databases: CINAHL, Cochrane, and PubMed. Inclusion criteria were measureable outcomes that compared NP to another provider type (physician or PA). RESULTS: Of 1,541 articles identified in the search, 40 met our inclusion criteria. Twenty-four articles focused on inpatient care settings while 16 focused on outpatient settings. Eighteen articles found improved outcomes with NPs compared to other provider types. States with full NP practice authority had improved patient health outcomes compared to those states that did not. Other factors, such as medical costs, were reduced with care provided by a NP compared to other provider types. CONCLUSIONS: Within their scope of practice, NPs can provide similar quality care to patients as compared to physicians and PAs in the inpatient setting at a lower medical cost. Further research is needed on NP outcomes in the primary care setting.

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Apr 18th, 3:30 PM

A Comparison of Nurse Practitioner, Physician Assistant, and Physician Outcomes: Is There a Difference?

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

PURPOSE: As the United States population continues to increase, a physician shortage of over 90,000 providers are expected by 2025. During that time, the number of nurse practitioners (NPs) available to fill the provider gap will increase. However, many states, including Michigan, limit the scope of practice of NPs. The purpose of this research project was to evaluate the outcomes of NP care compared to physicians and physician assistants (PAs). METHODS AND MATERIALS: This research project found scholarly articles that evaluated the outcomes of physician, NP, and PA care. A review of literature was conducted using articles published from 2012 to 2016 in the following databases: CINAHL, Cochrane, and PubMed. Inclusion criteria were measureable outcomes that compared NP to another provider type (physician or PA). RESULTS: Of 1,541 articles identified in the search, 40 met our inclusion criteria. Twenty-four articles focused on inpatient care settings while 16 focused on outpatient settings. Eighteen articles found improved outcomes with NPs compared to other provider types. States with full NP practice authority had improved patient health outcomes compared to those states that did not. Other factors, such as medical costs, were reduced with care provided by a NP compared to other provider types. CONCLUSIONS: Within their scope of practice, NPs can provide similar quality care to patients as compared to physicians and PAs in the inpatient setting at a lower medical cost. Further research is needed on NP outcomes in the primary care setting.