Event Title

Nutrition and the Person-in-Environment Perspective: Implications for Social Work

Location

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

Start Date

18-4-2017 3:30 PM

Description

PURPOSE: This exploratory research study includes a discussion of how social workers integrate nutrition into practice; what social workers’ perceptions are regarding nutrition in the field of social work; and how social workers are trained on the topic of nutrition. SUBJECTS: Licensed master’s level social workers in the state of Michigan (n=45). METHODS AND MATERIALS: Participants were recruited online through Grand Valley State University’s School of Social Work listserv, social media, social work professors and colleagues. Participants completed an anonymous online survey through Google Forms which included 18 questions. The online survey involved open and closed-ended questions focusing on 1) integration of nutrition in practice; 2) perceptions on the value of nutrition in social work; and 3) nutrition training pre and post graduate school. ANALYSES: The statistical tests included descriptive statistics, frequency tables, Spearman’s rho correlations, and independent samples t-tests via SPSS version 22. RESULTS: Results indicate that the majority of social workers integrate nutrition through psychoeducation. Participants primarily perceived nutrition as “moderately valuable” with clients and in the field of social work. Most social workers have not received nutrition education pre or post-graduate school. CONCLUSIONS: Further research is required on the topic of nutrition and social work.

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Apr 18th, 3:30 PM

Nutrition and the Person-in-Environment Perspective: Implications for Social Work

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

PURPOSE: This exploratory research study includes a discussion of how social workers integrate nutrition into practice; what social workers’ perceptions are regarding nutrition in the field of social work; and how social workers are trained on the topic of nutrition. SUBJECTS: Licensed master’s level social workers in the state of Michigan (n=45). METHODS AND MATERIALS: Participants were recruited online through Grand Valley State University’s School of Social Work listserv, social media, social work professors and colleagues. Participants completed an anonymous online survey through Google Forms which included 18 questions. The online survey involved open and closed-ended questions focusing on 1) integration of nutrition in practice; 2) perceptions on the value of nutrition in social work; and 3) nutrition training pre and post graduate school. ANALYSES: The statistical tests included descriptive statistics, frequency tables, Spearman’s rho correlations, and independent samples t-tests via SPSS version 22. RESULTS: Results indicate that the majority of social workers integrate nutrition through psychoeducation. Participants primarily perceived nutrition as “moderately valuable” with clients and in the field of social work. Most social workers have not received nutrition education pre or post-graduate school. CONCLUSIONS: Further research is required on the topic of nutrition and social work.