Event Title

Factors Contributing to the Perceptions and Utilization of Prenatal Care: Integrating Preconception Education into a Comprehensive Sex Education Curriculum

Location

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

Start Date

10-4-2018 3:30 PM

Description

SUBJECT: In the United States, inadequate prenatal care negatively contributes to unplanned pregnancy and poor outcomes. Preconception education (PCE) in high school provides basic prenatal care knowledge to students and begins to encourage self-efficacy to seek out prenatal care for when they do become pregnant. A comprehensive sex education (CSE) curriculum that includes PCE may provide the only information about prenatal care to those who do not pursue higher education. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to identify the multiple factors that may impact the perceptions and utilization of prenatal care in women, and to determine if PCE should be implemented in CSE. METHODS AND MATERIALS: In this study, participants included women ages 18 and older who attended high school in Michigan. A 29-question survey was given to participants including demographic information and questions that relate to this project’s objectives. ANALYSES: Survey results were analyzed using both a qualitative thematic analysis and quantitative analysis using logistic regression and frequencies. RESULTS: Of the 74 participants, most women received PCE from parents, doctors, and media as opposed to CSE. While only three women believe that abstinence-only sex education (AOSE) should be taught in schools, most received an AOSE that did not include PCE. Additionally, women from East Michigan were less likely to receive information on prenatal care than those from West Michigan. CONCLUSIONS: It is evident that CSE that includes preconception education would be an effective tool in reducing unplanned pregnancy and improving maternal and child health.

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Apr 10th, 3:30 PM

Factors Contributing to the Perceptions and Utilization of Prenatal Care: Integrating Preconception Education into a Comprehensive Sex Education Curriculum

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

SUBJECT: In the United States, inadequate prenatal care negatively contributes to unplanned pregnancy and poor outcomes. Preconception education (PCE) in high school provides basic prenatal care knowledge to students and begins to encourage self-efficacy to seek out prenatal care for when they do become pregnant. A comprehensive sex education (CSE) curriculum that includes PCE may provide the only information about prenatal care to those who do not pursue higher education. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to identify the multiple factors that may impact the perceptions and utilization of prenatal care in women, and to determine if PCE should be implemented in CSE. METHODS AND MATERIALS: In this study, participants included women ages 18 and older who attended high school in Michigan. A 29-question survey was given to participants including demographic information and questions that relate to this project’s objectives. ANALYSES: Survey results were analyzed using both a qualitative thematic analysis and quantitative analysis using logistic regression and frequencies. RESULTS: Of the 74 participants, most women received PCE from parents, doctors, and media as opposed to CSE. While only three women believe that abstinence-only sex education (AOSE) should be taught in schools, most received an AOSE that did not include PCE. Additionally, women from East Michigan were less likely to receive information on prenatal care than those from West Michigan. CONCLUSIONS: It is evident that CSE that includes preconception education would be an effective tool in reducing unplanned pregnancy and improving maternal and child health.