Event Title

Association Between Waste Production and County Health Outcomes in Michigan

Location

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

Start Date

10-4-2018 3:30 PM

Comments

PURPOSE: Today’s world faces increased urbanization and consequently, increased population density and greater waste production. However, knowledge is limited on the impact this waste production could be having on human health outcomes. This study evaluated the association between waste production in all counties across Michigan and overall health status of the counties. METHODS: Summary scores for all 83 counties were calculated using publicly available data from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation: County Health Rankings and Roadmaps. Amount of waste produced by each county was weighted by percent rural. Linear regression was run to examine the association between health scores and waste production per county. RESULTS: The average county in Michigan is 61.6% rural (SD=27.4), has a population of 119,550 (SD=258,905) and produced 263 tons of waste a day (SD=569.6). For every one-ton increase in waste production, the associated health score was 0.0009 units greater (Beta = 0.0009; p-value=0.00032) when adjusting for air pollution, education level, physical inactivity, and county size. Low Birth Weight health scores increased by 9.45 units for every one-ton of waste produced (Beta= 9.45; p-value= 0.0177). DISCUSSION: This study found that more waste production has a negative outcome on health scores in Michigan, and especially on birth oucomes. This information could bring about a better understanding of the impact waste has on health, as well as help inform regulations and policies around waste management. It is imperative we seek to understand this burden and alternative management strategies to attenuate future health hazards for Michigan residents.

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Apr 10th, 3:30 PM

Association Between Waste Production and County Health Outcomes in Michigan

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall