Event Title

Impact of EHR Usability on Provider Efficiency and Patient Safety in Non-Hospital Settings

Location

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

Start Date

15-4-2019 3:30 PM

Description

PURPOSE: Electronic health records (EHR) have been implemented in many hospital and non-hospital settings. They boast improved patient interactions and productivity but severe, unintended consequences of this implementation have emerged. Given the importance of EHRs to patient care, it is necessary to identify the strengths and weaknesses of these systems to better improve them. This study aims to better assess the implementation of EHRs in non-hospital settings using surveys and group interviews of medical centers. BACKGROUND: Assessment of the implementation of EHRs has been conducted in the past, but focused on hospital settings. Healthcare facilities are far more diverse in setup and practice for this one analysis to be applicable to all local offices. Therefore, more research needs to be conducted on the viability of EHRs in non-hospital settings. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Analysis will be conducted using surveys and group interviews focusing on several categories and subcategories identified via a literature review of EHR implementation in hospitals. These areas focus on provider-centric consequences, patient-centric consequences, and overall outcomes. ANALYSIS: Surveys and interview responses will be recorded an analyzed for common themes both inter-office and intra-office. These common themes will be grouped into positive and negative outcomes of EHR implementation. RESULTS: The research is still ongoing and data collection has not been concluded, therefore no definitive results can be provided yet. CONCLUSIONS: EHRs are an integral part of healthcare settings, and should aim for constant development in order to improve the goals of increased overall wellbeing of patients and protecting personal information. This research will identify shortcomings to these objectives given a sample of offices as well as potentially establish methods to improve the implementation of EHRs in non-hospital settings.

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Apr 15th, 3:30 PM

Impact of EHR Usability on Provider Efficiency and Patient Safety in Non-Hospital Settings

Hager-Lubbers Exhibition Hall

PURPOSE: Electronic health records (EHR) have been implemented in many hospital and non-hospital settings. They boast improved patient interactions and productivity but severe, unintended consequences of this implementation have emerged. Given the importance of EHRs to patient care, it is necessary to identify the strengths and weaknesses of these systems to better improve them. This study aims to better assess the implementation of EHRs in non-hospital settings using surveys and group interviews of medical centers. BACKGROUND: Assessment of the implementation of EHRs has been conducted in the past, but focused on hospital settings. Healthcare facilities are far more diverse in setup and practice for this one analysis to be applicable to all local offices. Therefore, more research needs to be conducted on the viability of EHRs in non-hospital settings. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Analysis will be conducted using surveys and group interviews focusing on several categories and subcategories identified via a literature review of EHR implementation in hospitals. These areas focus on provider-centric consequences, patient-centric consequences, and overall outcomes. ANALYSIS: Surveys and interview responses will be recorded an analyzed for common themes both inter-office and intra-office. These common themes will be grouped into positive and negative outcomes of EHR implementation. RESULTS: The research is still ongoing and data collection has not been concluded, therefore no definitive results can be provided yet. CONCLUSIONS: EHRs are an integral part of healthcare settings, and should aim for constant development in order to improve the goals of increased overall wellbeing of patients and protecting personal information. This research will identify shortcomings to these objectives given a sample of offices as well as potentially establish methods to improve the implementation of EHRs in non-hospital settings.