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Hauenstein Center

About This Journal

In March 2015, the Midwestern History Association launched Studies in Midwestern History to create a space for commentary about the field of Midwestern history. Jon K. Lauck served as General Editor, with Paul Putz and Michael Skaggs serving as Managing Editors.

In June 2017, Scott St. Louis and the scholarly communications team at Grand Valley State University Libraries managed the journal’s transition to the GVSU institutional repository. Through 2017 and 2018, the journal gained an editorial and advisory board. The new journal website launched in summer 2018, the journal received an ISSN number, and the journal backlogs were updated to include abstracts for each article.

The journal is presently closed to new, unsolicited submissions. Stay tuned!

If you are interested in submitting a manuscript to Studies for consideration, please view our Aims & Scope for details.

Open Access Statement and Creative Commons Licensing for Published Articles

Studies in Midwestern History is an online journal affiliated with the Midwestern History Association. The journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making scholarship freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge. Users have the right to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of articles in this journal, and to use them for any other lawful purpose, under the terms specified by the five different Creative Commons licenses under which articles in this journal can be published.

Creative Commons licenses are an easy way to tell users how you would like an intellectual or creative work to be used, shared, and built upon. Selecting a Creative Commons license makes it easier for people to use and share authors’ work, because they don’t have to track authors down, ask permission, and wait for a response.

For more information about Creative Commons licenses and specific license options, visit www.creativecommons.org/licenses or follow the links below to specific license explanations.

Attribution (CC-BY 4.0): Anyone may share and adapt the work in any way, even for commercial purposes. Users agree to provide appropriate credit to the author.

Attribution – Noncommercial (CC-BY-NC 4.0): Anyone may share and adapt the work in any way, but may not use the material for commercial purposes. Users agree to provide appropriate credit to the author.

Attribution – NoDerivatives (CC-BY-ND 4.0): Anyone may share the work, but may not make adaptations or other derivative works. Users sharing the work agree to provide appropriate credit to the author.

Attribution– Noncommercial– NoDerivatives (CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0): Anyone may share the work, but may not use it for commercial purposes and may not create adaptations or derivative works. Users sharing the work agree to provide appropriate credit to the author.

Public Domain Dedication (CC-0): The creator of this work waives all of their rights in the work. The creator wants to let anyone use this work in any way, for any purpose, with no restrictions.

The above explanation of Creative Commons licensing is based on language provided by the scholarly communications team at Grand Valley State University Libraries.