Date of Award

4-2015

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Education (M.Ed.)

Department

College of Education

Abstract

Current reforms of teacher evaluation systems in the state of Michigan are meant to improve teacher effectiveness, resulting in increased student growth and achievement. However, little research exists to support best practices in the evaluation of special education teachers. The evaluation of special education teachers involves many unique challenges which are especially apparent when evaluating teachers of students with lowincidence disabilities. The tools and processes being proposed by the state are born from research within general education and, consequently, may not be effective in meeting the unique challenges of evaluating special education teachers. The perceptions of special education administrators regarding the effectiveness of tools/systems currently being used in Michigan to evaluate teachers of students with lowincidence disabilities are examined in this study. In addition, the perceptions of special education administrators regarding the importance of certain evaluation components within evaluation tools/systems to be used with teachers of students with low-incidence disabilities are also examined. The perceived effectiveness varied across respondents. However, the perceived effectiveness of evaluation tools was higher when the tool had been modified specifically for teachers of students with low-incidence disabilities. The components of evaluation rated most important by respondents were ones that were most unique to special education teachers. It is concluded that current tools/systems being used to evaluate teachers of students with low-incidence disabilities need to be modified in order to be effective.

Included in

Education Commons

Share

COinS