Event Title

Providing Patient Safety through Interprofessional Collaboration: A Clarion Competition Project

Location

DeVos 117E

Start Date

7-1-2011 9:45 AM

End Date

7-1-2011 10:00 AM

Description

Purpose of Presentation: To provide participants with background to develop interprofessional student teams to use root-cause analysis to examine complex hypothesized less than optimal patient scenarios and to develop a system focused plan to prevent sentinel events, required for CLARION (a University of Minnesota's student initiative dedicated to improving health care through interprofessional collaboration) competition. The overall purpose of the project was to facilitate student health professionals' understanding of interprofessional collaboration to problem-solve and discover team efforts as superior to any one individual profession. The presentation will describe how to organize a team and prepare for application to CLARION competition.

Background/Significance: The Institute of Medicine reports that 98,000 lives are lost each year due to medical errors and lack of communication is cited as a major cause. Interprofessional communication during educational experiences can promote leadership and collaboration skills among health professionals that prevent unnecessary deaths during clinical practice.

Methodology: The university health sciences center administration appointed faculty champions from school of medicine, allied health and nursing. The faculty champions developed programs and activities to inform faculty and students about the importance of interprofessional communication. The faculty champions in collaboration with deans and department chairs recruited student volunteers to participate in an interprofessional team to prepare for the CLARION competition. The team was organized according to CLARION competition rules. Faculty advisors and coach conducted a weekend retreat and workshop to prepare students in root-cause analysis. Students participated in a simulated presentation of case study to panel of local judges that provided feedback and guidelines for improvement.

Results: Three students participated in the national competition (two from medicine and one from pharmacy) and one additional student (from laboratory science) served as student coach. The team performed very well and received outstanding review from the national judges. Students evaluated the experience as beneficial and expressed interest in interprofessional communication and collaboration. All indicated a mutual respect and increased knowledge of the importance of each other's role in patient care and safety.

Conclusions: Interprofessional communication and collaboration skills can be achieved among health professions college students. The roles of various healthcare providers were demonstrated and acknowledged as valued from all the students who participated in the project.



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Jan 7th, 9:45 AM Jan 7th, 10:00 AM

Providing Patient Safety through Interprofessional Collaboration: A Clarion Competition Project

DeVos 117E

Purpose of Presentation: To provide participants with background to develop interprofessional student teams to use root-cause analysis to examine complex hypothesized less than optimal patient scenarios and to develop a system focused plan to prevent sentinel events, required for CLARION (a University of Minnesota's student initiative dedicated to improving health care through interprofessional collaboration) competition. The overall purpose of the project was to facilitate student health professionals' understanding of interprofessional collaboration to problem-solve and discover team efforts as superior to any one individual profession. The presentation will describe how to organize a team and prepare for application to CLARION competition.

Background/Significance: The Institute of Medicine reports that 98,000 lives are lost each year due to medical errors and lack of communication is cited as a major cause. Interprofessional communication during educational experiences can promote leadership and collaboration skills among health professionals that prevent unnecessary deaths during clinical practice.

Methodology: The university health sciences center administration appointed faculty champions from school of medicine, allied health and nursing. The faculty champions developed programs and activities to inform faculty and students about the importance of interprofessional communication. The faculty champions in collaboration with deans and department chairs recruited student volunteers to participate in an interprofessional team to prepare for the CLARION competition. The team was organized according to CLARION competition rules. Faculty advisors and coach conducted a weekend retreat and workshop to prepare students in root-cause analysis. Students participated in a simulated presentation of case study to panel of local judges that provided feedback and guidelines for improvement.

Results: Three students participated in the national competition (two from medicine and one from pharmacy) and one additional student (from laboratory science) served as student coach. The team performed very well and received outstanding review from the national judges. Students evaluated the experience as beneficial and expressed interest in interprofessional communication and collaboration. All indicated a mutual respect and increased knowledge of the importance of each other's role in patient care and safety.

Conclusions: Interprofessional communication and collaboration skills can be achieved among health professions college students. The roles of various healthcare providers were demonstrated and acknowledged as valued from all the students who participated in the project.