Event Title

Pandemic Influenza Simulation Exercise: A Successful Addition to the Interprofessional Curriculum in Patient Safety, Quality Improvement, and Teamwork

Presenter Information

Robert A. DeGraaff PhD, MBA

Location

DeVos 117E

Start Date

7-1-2011 9:45 AM

End Date

7-1-2011 10:00 AM

Description

Purpose of Presentation: This poster presentation (a) describes the Interprofessional Curriculum in Patient Safety, Quality Improvement, and Teamwork at the University of Missouri, (b) features the purpose, planning, delivery, student and facilitator experience, and lessons learned from recently incorporated Pandemic Influenza Response simulation exercises, and (c) provides an interactive component where conference attendees are invited to complete one element of the pandemic influenza simulation experience-the Card Sort Prioritization Activity for Organizational Decision-Making and Leadership.

Background/Significance: The Interprofessional Curriculum is an annual four-week educational module for students from the Schools of Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Health Professions. For several years, the curriculum has included an interprofessional case study involving root cause analysis and small group discussion to evaluate an adverse event and develop recommendations aimed at sustainably improving systems and processes to achieve better patient care safety, quality, and value. In 2010, the simulation portion of the curriculum was expanded into a pandemic influenza context.

Methodology: In the simulation exercise, each interprofessional team encountered five patients in an urgent care setting. Two of the five patients presented influenza symptoms, and a third influenza patient entered the room ten minutes into the simulation. In addition to clinical evaluation of the patients, students were expected to recognize and discuss numerous safety threats-based on National Patient Safety goals-that were embedded into the scenarios. In the card sort activity, teams of health services management stUdents categorized 24 index cards (where each card identified a leadership action or organizational response for coordinating and managing the influenza outbreak) into one of four urgency/priority categories. By design, about 80% of the cards were sorted into the "High Urgency/Immediate Priority" category.

Results and Conclusions: In total, more than 250 students participated in the 2010 simulation. To evaluate curriculum effectiveness, a pre/post survey of knowledge, skills, and attitudes measured significant increases in participants' agreement that, for example, "Interprofessionallearning is an effective strategy for teamwork skill development" (p-value=.0002). Improvement opportunities were noted in the percentage of students correctly recognizing and responding to patient safety hazards embedded in the simulation such as a wrong medication dose and patient fall risks.



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Jan 7th, 9:45 AM Jan 7th, 10:00 AM

Pandemic Influenza Simulation Exercise: A Successful Addition to the Interprofessional Curriculum in Patient Safety, Quality Improvement, and Teamwork

DeVos 117E

Purpose of Presentation: This poster presentation (a) describes the Interprofessional Curriculum in Patient Safety, Quality Improvement, and Teamwork at the University of Missouri, (b) features the purpose, planning, delivery, student and facilitator experience, and lessons learned from recently incorporated Pandemic Influenza Response simulation exercises, and (c) provides an interactive component where conference attendees are invited to complete one element of the pandemic influenza simulation experience-the Card Sort Prioritization Activity for Organizational Decision-Making and Leadership.

Background/Significance: The Interprofessional Curriculum is an annual four-week educational module for students from the Schools of Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Health Professions. For several years, the curriculum has included an interprofessional case study involving root cause analysis and small group discussion to evaluate an adverse event and develop recommendations aimed at sustainably improving systems and processes to achieve better patient care safety, quality, and value. In 2010, the simulation portion of the curriculum was expanded into a pandemic influenza context.

Methodology: In the simulation exercise, each interprofessional team encountered five patients in an urgent care setting. Two of the five patients presented influenza symptoms, and a third influenza patient entered the room ten minutes into the simulation. In addition to clinical evaluation of the patients, students were expected to recognize and discuss numerous safety threats-based on National Patient Safety goals-that were embedded into the scenarios. In the card sort activity, teams of health services management stUdents categorized 24 index cards (where each card identified a leadership action or organizational response for coordinating and managing the influenza outbreak) into one of four urgency/priority categories. By design, about 80% of the cards were sorted into the "High Urgency/Immediate Priority" category.

Results and Conclusions: In total, more than 250 students participated in the 2010 simulation. To evaluate curriculum effectiveness, a pre/post survey of knowledge, skills, and attitudes measured significant increases in participants' agreement that, for example, "Interprofessionallearning is an effective strategy for teamwork skill development" (p-value=.0002). Improvement opportunities were noted in the percentage of students correctly recognizing and responding to patient safety hazards embedded in the simulation such as a wrong medication dose and patient fall risks.