Event Title

A Method for Providing High-Volume Interprofessional Simulation Encounters in Physical and Occupational Therapy Education Programs

Location

DeVos 117E

Start Date

7-1-2011 9:45 AM

End Date

7-1-2011 10:00 AM

Description

Background: With an increasing emphasis on interprofessional education within the allied health professions, simulation has potential for being a useful teaching modality for providing collaborative learning experiences for occupational and physical therapist students. However, there are many challenges associated with conducting simulations with large numbers of students.

Methodology: The present paper describes the design, planning, cost, and support staff time required for conducting an interprofessional simulation of the intensive care setting, including a methodology for maximizing resources and opportunities for 64 physical and occupational therapy students over a four hour time period. Qualitative analyses of student experiences are also presented.

Results: Students were able to participate in a simulated intensive care unit for individuals with severe burns as both direct participants ("clinicians") as well as by viewing their peers via a live video stream ("observers"). Debriefings allowed for feedback from peers, faculty, and standardized patients. Qualitative analysis of the self- and peer-evaluations and the final group debriefing revealed themes regarding range of motion measurement, patient-centered care, role delineation and teamwork, and simulation logistics.

Conclusions: Simulation-based learning is highly-valued and well-liked by students, but requires considerable staff and monetary resources beyond the time the primary faculty member might spend developing a new laboratory or learning activity. The actual cost of a simulation could vary considerably between institutions depending on the level of fidelity and technology available or desired, the salary of the staff that are utilized to plan and conduct a simulation, and the availability and quality of technological infrastructure (e.g., video servers, cameras). Interprofessional simUlation experiences provide an opportunity for health professions students to learn with and from students in other disciplines. This high-volume method maximized the use of resources, including space, personnel, student time, and standardized patient time.



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Jan 7th, 9:45 AM Jan 7th, 10:00 AM

A Method for Providing High-Volume Interprofessional Simulation Encounters in Physical and Occupational Therapy Education Programs

DeVos 117E

Background: With an increasing emphasis on interprofessional education within the allied health professions, simulation has potential for being a useful teaching modality for providing collaborative learning experiences for occupational and physical therapist students. However, there are many challenges associated with conducting simulations with large numbers of students.

Methodology: The present paper describes the design, planning, cost, and support staff time required for conducting an interprofessional simulation of the intensive care setting, including a methodology for maximizing resources and opportunities for 64 physical and occupational therapy students over a four hour time period. Qualitative analyses of student experiences are also presented.

Results: Students were able to participate in a simulated intensive care unit for individuals with severe burns as both direct participants ("clinicians") as well as by viewing their peers via a live video stream ("observers"). Debriefings allowed for feedback from peers, faculty, and standardized patients. Qualitative analysis of the self- and peer-evaluations and the final group debriefing revealed themes regarding range of motion measurement, patient-centered care, role delineation and teamwork, and simulation logistics.

Conclusions: Simulation-based learning is highly-valued and well-liked by students, but requires considerable staff and monetary resources beyond the time the primary faculty member might spend developing a new laboratory or learning activity. The actual cost of a simulation could vary considerably between institutions depending on the level of fidelity and technology available or desired, the salary of the staff that are utilized to plan and conduct a simulation, and the availability and quality of technological infrastructure (e.g., video servers, cameras). Interprofessional simUlation experiences provide an opportunity for health professions students to learn with and from students in other disciplines. This high-volume method maximized the use of resources, including space, personnel, student time, and standardized patient time.