Previous research studies have explored the activities, motivations, and outcomes for the culinary tourist, and researchers have theorized certain segments of culinary travelers (Boniface, 2003; Mitchell, Hall & McIntosh, 2000). Contrasting to this, investigation into “the foodie” and his or her activities at home has been strikingly infrequent. Exploring the foodie ‘at home’ or the foodie’s everyday behavior is critical to understanding different types of foodies, how to market to foodies, and their decision-making processes for culinary travel. The purpose of this study is to test, via an online survey, a scale that distinguishes between different types of foodies, and determine if their home-foodie habits are the same while traveling. The study includes five samples: all of the populations were selected to attempt to get a variety of respondents; some settings were food-focused and some were not. Factor analysis was used to group like respondents together; factors that overlapped across samples includes Sustainable Food Activist, Cooking, Cooking Competitor/Do-It-Yourself, Trendy Traveler, Gardening, and Drinking activity dimensions. Food-related businesses and tourism marketers would benefit from greater distinction between types of foodies so as to develop and market specific products to them, to create new packages with complementary activities, and to convert ‘crossover’ markets who visit for one reason but who could be convinced to ‘cross over’ to participate in other activities.


foodie, culinary travel, food activities, factor analysis, foodie scale