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Abstract

It thus makes sense that critics tend to present strong arguments about the political agendas of Mexican filmmakers from the 1970s. Among the most popular in the subject is Paul Leduc, whose work has been cast as exemplary of the political ethos of the day. However, it is my position that, upon close examination, Leduc’s films seem not always to present a straightforward political message, much less one that would clearly bolster the aims of the Echeverria administration. For that reason, I will examine two of Leduc’s films, Reed: México Insurgente and Frida: naturaleza viva (1983), to reveal how they both shed light on, but in other ways subtly qualify, the aims of the leftist political movement that, at least in part, constituted the basis of the “new” Mexican cinema of the 1970s and early 1980s.

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